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Frederick Harris & Frederick D Wheelock Serivice.

Frederick Harris & Frederick D Wheelock Serivice.

Frederick E. Harris and Frederick D. Wheelock were cousins once removed. Their most common ancestor was Artimus Wheelock 1801-1871. They mustered into the 33rd Michigan Volunteer Infantry company H at Island Lake, Michigan, between 13-20, May, 1898.


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Company H, 33rd Michigan Volunteer Infantry. Unfortunately the names of the pictured individuals were not recorded but we can assume both Freds are in this picture.
Company H, 33rd Michigan Volunteer Infantry. Unfortunately the names of the pictured individuals were not recorded but we can assume both Freds are in this picture.
Michigan Volunteers of '98 a Complete Photographic Record of Michigan's Part in the 1898 Spanish-American War. Published by G.F. Sterling Detroit, Michigan 1898. Pages not numbered. About page 43.  
 
2
Leaving Island Lake.
Leaving Island Lake.
44 officers and 978 enlisted men joined the 33rd Michigan Infantry. Both Freds were assigned to Company H. They left Island Lake May 28, 1898. They arrived at Camp Alger, Virginia, May 31, 1898.

They left Camp Alger June 22, 1898; arrived at Newport News, Virginia, June 23, 1898. They then sailed from Newport News the same day and arrived at Siboney, Cuba, June 27, 1898.

Michigan Volunteers of '98 a Complete Photographic Record of Michigan's Part in the 1898 Spanish-American War. Published by G.F. Sterling Detroit, Michigan 1898. Pages not numbered. 
 
3
The Battle of the Aguadores.
The Battle of the Aguadores.
They fought in the Battle of the Aguadores July 1, 1898.

The skirmish on the banks of the Aguadores River was meant as a distraction for the attacks that would take place later that day at San Juan Hill and El Caney. The 33rd Michigan had to take a train to within one mile of the river. Both battalions couldn’t fit in the train at the same time so it had to be done in two trips giving the Spanish plenty of warning of the attack to come.

The attack began at 9:00am. The 33rd fought with small arms as shells sailed over their heads from naval bombardment. Given that the Spanish had plenty of time to dig in the naval attack had little affect and the Americans were being overpowered. They were under attack from directed artillery fire and, while the Spanish could maintain their concealment due to their use of modern Mauser rifles that used smokeless powder the Americans signaled their position every time they risked a shot.

At 1:30pm the Americans could not advance and they needed to resupply so the order was given to break off the attack. The Secretary of the Army would declare the battle a success claiming that the distraction worked but, there were differing opinions.

Picture from “Harper's pictorial history of the war with Spain” Volume II, Harper & brothers, New York, 1899. Page 345. 
 
4
The Siege of Santiago.
The Siege of Santiago.
The Battles of San Juan Hill and El Carney were a success. The Americans captured the Spanish positions at both locations. On July 3, 1898, the siege of Santiago began. Company H of the Michigan 33rd was part of this. The generals figured an assault would bring massive casualties so the Americans dug in and stopped the flow of food and water into the city.

On July 4th there was a cease fire that allowed the evacuation of around 20,000 civilians. This also helped the Americans as they were able to bring in heavy weapons to support the operation. In the days that followed the Spanish took heavy casualties from Gatling guns, mortars and field artillery. On July 13th meetings began to discuss the terms of surrender. The Spanish would eventually agree to the term capitulation. The United States flag was raised over the fort at Santiago on July 17th. This picture misidentifies the date as the 13th.

Picture from “Harper's pictorial history of the war with Spain” Volume II, Harper & brothers, New York, 1899. Page 412.  
 
5
The USS Harvard.
The USS Harvard.
While the Spanish-American war was not over, the fall of Santiago effectively ended land war in Cuba.

On August 21, 1898 Company H sailed from Santiago on steamship "Harvard". Originally it was a passenger liner the "City of New York" but, it was renamed after the college when it was put into service as a scout ship at the beginning of the war. Towards the end of the war it was used as a troop transport.

The schooner-rigged steamship arrived at Montauk Point, New York, August 26, 1898.

The 33rd left Montauk Point September 2, 1898 and, arrived at Detroit, Michigan, September 4, 1898 where they were furloughed for sixty days.

The Freds mustered out of service at Cheboygan, Michigan.
 
 
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Michigan 33rd Infantry, Company H.
Michigan 33rd Infantry, Company H.
This roster of Company H lists Fred D. Wheelock as an atifcer, an archaic noun meaning a skilled mechanic in the armed forces and Frederick E. Harris as a private.

From Michigan Volunteers of '98 a Complete Photographic Record of Michigan's Part in the 1898 Spanish-American War. Published by G.F. Sterling Detroit, Michigan 1898. 
 


Linked to Frederick E Harris (7204), Frederick David Wheelock (7225)